Provision #859: And Then There Was One

Laser Provision

It’s time to conclude our series on mindfulness that has delved into one, simple notion: and then there was one. There is no you and there is no me. There is no other and there is no self. There is no over and there is under. There are, in fact, no distinctions that withstand mindful scrutiny. There is, rather, but one fabric of life, woven from the pattern of who we are and of who we might become. Our job, then, is to appreciate it fully and to do all that we can to make it ever more visible and true.

LifeTrek Provision

For the next six weeks I am visiting my daughter and her ever-growing family in Las Vegas including her husband, her in-laws, and her soon-to-be-born twin girls. It’s hard to imagine anything more special than times such as these. I am, therefore, going to take a break from writing and sending out Provisions during for the next six weeks. Upon my return, I already have an idea of where I am going to go with the next series (and I’m sure I’ll be mulling that around in the back of my mind). For now, however, it’s time to focus my attention on family.

To recap the series I have been writing on mindfulness, it’s helpful to start by looking at the titles of the Provisions in the series and to reread the ones that seem particularly relevant and meaningful at this point in time. Here are the topics we have covered since the beginning of January, concluding with today’s:

Quite apart from what I wrote in those Provisions, don’t the titles themselves invite you to contemplate and explore the simple yet challenging notion that one can hold a full and complete awareness of what is happening in the present moment without critique or judgment? Practicing mindfulness does just that. The more mindful we become the more we appreciate the true nature of life: and then there was one.

There really are no differences that matter, that are beyond reconciliation, or that should hold us apart. Differences lie on the surface of things: from skin color to position in life to religious orientation to political persuasion to national origin. Wars have been fought over such things, but such hostilities have been always misguided. These are not the things that make people good or bad, better or worse, righteous or evil. On the contrary, there is no basis for war at all since, in the end, we are all the same, we are all human beings.

And all human beings deserve respect, consideration, compassion, and love. This recognition is both the inspiration for and the outcome of mindfulness. We yearn to become one with one another and, indeed, with all of life, and the more we yearn for this the more we make it so. The very act of contemplating solidarity enhances our solidarity with life, an awareness that makes us ever-more insightful, compassionate, generous, and true.

So we end this series where we began, namely, with the invitation for you to become one with yourself, with others, and with all of life. Really one. Not just casually one, but deeply and religiously one. We invite you to explore and to adopt practices that make your heart sing, as though you were a bird calling out to greet the morning with love and to risk, again, the full living of another new day. That, at least for me, is the dynamic truth behind Robert Frost’s famous poem, “The Road Not Taken”.

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

For most all of us, mindfulness is the road not taken but, to borrow, that famous line: choosing to do so makes all the difference. So why not go down that road today?

Coaching Inquiries: What does mindfulness mean to you? How would you describe your commitment to mindfulness? What practices assist you to be more mindful? Who are your partners on the journey of mindful living? How could you make that community even more dynamic and true?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


I resonated with our last Provision on mindful generosity. Learning to practice non-fear is my mission. Thanks. 

May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching Internationalwww.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformationwww.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coachingwww.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a TimeOnline Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #858: Mindful Generosity by Thich Nhat Hanh

Laser Provision

Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk born in 1926, is a well-known public figure and practitioner of mindfulness. For today’s Provision, I reprint excerpts from his 1994 essay on generosity. Given the depth and challenge of his reflections, connecting mindfulness and generosity, I encourage you to read the essay when you have the time to read it carefully and reflectively. It holds out the promise of redemptive transformation for one and all.

LifeTrek Provision

Aware of the suffering caused by exploitation, social injustice, stealing, and oppression, I vow to cultivate loving kindness and learn ways to work for the well-being of people, animals, plants, and minerals. I vow to practice generosity by sharing my time, energy, and material resources with those who are in real need. I am determined not to steal and not to possess anything that should belong to others. I will respect the property of others, but I will prevent others from profiting from human suffering or the suffering of other species on Earth.

Exploitation, social injustice, and stealing come in many forms. Oppression is one form of stealing that causes much suffering in the world. The moment we vow to cultivate loving kindness, loving kindness is born in us, and we make every effort to stop exploitation, social injustice, stealing, and oppression.

In the First Precept, we find the words “compassion” and “loving kindness.” Compassion and loving kindness are the two aspects of love taught by the Buddha. Compassion is the intention and capacity to relieve the suffering of another person or living being. Loving kindness is the intention and capacity to bring joy and happiness to another person or living being.

These two intentions and capacities seek to cultivate the energy of loving kindness and to learn ways to work for the well-being of all people, animals, plants and minerals. Doing so requires us to look deeply in order to find ways to express it fully. To promote the well-being of all people, animals, plants, and minerals, we have to come together as communities and examine our situations, exercising our intelligence and ability to look deeply so that we can discover appropriate ways to express way of doing so in the midst of real problems.

Suppose you want to help those who are suffering under a dictatorship. In the past you may have tried sending in troops to overthrow their government, but doing so causes the deaths of many innocent people, and may not even succeed in overthrowing the dictator.

Fortunately, there are better ways. If you look more deeply, with loving kindness, you can find a better way to help these people without causing suffering; you may realize that the best time to help is before the country falls into the hands of a dictator. You can then, for example, offer the young people of that country the opportunity to learn democratic ways of governing by giving them scholarships to countries and institutions where they can learn those ways. That would be a good investment for peace in the future.

This could, for example, facilitate democracy from within so as to avoid the “necessity” of bombing countries and sending in troops to “liberate” them. This is just one example of how looking deeply and learning can help us find ways to do things that are more in line with loving kindness. If we wait until the situation gets bad, it may be too late. If we practice the precepts together with politicians, soldiers, businessmen, lawyers, legislators, artists, writers, and teachers, we can find the best ways to practice compassion, loving kindness, and understanding.

It requires time, of course, to practice such generosity. We may want to help those who are hungry, but we are caught in the problems of our own daily lives. Sometimes, one pill or a little rice could save the life of a child, but we do not take the time to help, because we think we do not have the time. In Ho Chi Minh City, for example, there are street children who call themselves “the dust of life.” They are homeless, and they wander the streets by day and sleep under trees at night. They scavenge in garbage heaps to find things like plastic bags they can sell for one or two cents per pound. The nuns and monks in Ho Chi Minh City have opened their temples to these children, and if the children agree to stay four hours in the morning — learning to read and write and playing with the monks and nuns — they are offered a vegetarian lunch. Then they can go to the Buddha hall for a nap.

(In Vietnam, we always take naps after lunch; it is so hot. When the Americans came, they brought their practice of working eight hours, from nine to five. Many of us tried, but we could not do it. We desperately need our naps after lunch.)’

Then at two o’clock, there is more teaching and playing with the children who stay for the afternoon. We can provide them with dinner but the temple does not have a place for them to sleep overnight. It costs only twenty cents for a child to have both lunch and dinner, and it will keep him from being out on the streets, where he might steal cigarettes, smoke, use delinquent language, and learn the worst behavior. By encouraging the children to go to the temple, we help prevent them from becoming delinquent and entering prison later on. It takes time to help these children, not much money. There are so many simple things like this we can do to help people, but because we fail to free ourselves from our own situation and lifestyle, we do nothing at all.

We need to come together as a community, and, looking deeply, find ways to free ourselves so we can practice the Second Precept.: “I vow to practice generosity by sharing my time, energy, and material resources with those who are in real need.”“ This sentence is clear. The feeling of generosity and the capacity for being generous are not enough. We also need to express our generosity. We may feel that we don’t have the time to make people happy; we say, “Time is money,” but time is more than money. Life is for more than using time to make money. Time is for being alive, for sharing joy and happiness with others. The wealthy are often the least able to make others happy. Only those with time can do so.

“I am determined not to steal and not to possess anything that should belong to others. I will respect the property of others, but I will prevent others from profiting from human suffering or the suffering of other species on Earth.”“ When you practice one precept deeply, you will discover that you are practicing all five. The First Precept is about taking life, which is a form of stealing — stealing undermines the most precious thing someone has, his or her life.

When we meditate on the Second Precept, we see that stealing, in the forms of exploitation, social injustice, and oppression, are acts of killing — killing slowly by exploitation, by maintaining social injustice, and by political and economic oppression. Therefore, the Second Precept has much to do with the precept of not killing. We see the “inter-being” nature of the first two precepts. This is true of all Five Precepts. Some people formally receive just one or two precepts. I don’t mind, because if you practice one or two precepts deeply, all Five Precepts will be observed.

In 1991, I visited a friend in New York who was dying, Alfred Hassler. We had worked together in the peace movement for almost thirty years. Alfred looked as though he had been waiting for me to come before dying, and he died only a few hours after our visit. I went with my closest colleague, Sister Chan Khong which stands for True Emptiness.

Alfred was not awake when we arrived. His daughter Laura tried to wake him up, but she couldn’t. So I asked Sister Chan Khong to sing Alfred the “Song of No Coming and No Going:” “These eyes are not me, I am not caught by these eyes. This body is not me, I am not caught by this body. I am life without boundaries. I have never been born, I will never die.” The idea is taken from the “Samyutta Nikaya”. She sang so beautifully, and I saw streams of tears running down the faces of Alfred’s wife and children. They were tears of understanding, and they were very healing.

Suddenly, Alfred came back to himself. Sister Chan Khong began to practice what she had learned from studying the sutra “The Teaching Given to the Sick.” She said, “Alfred, do you remember the times we worked together?” She evoked many happy memories we had shared together, and Alfred was able to remember each of them. Although he was obviously in pain, he smiled. This practice brought results right away. When a person is suffering from so much pain, we sometimes can alleviate his suffering by watering the seeds of happiness that are in him. A kind of balance is restored and the pain diminishes.

Throughout our visit, I was practicing massage on his feet, and at one point I asked him whether he felt my hand on his body. When you are dying, areas of your body become numb, and you feel as if you have lost those parts of your body. Doing massage in mindfulness, gently, gives the dying person the feeling that he is alive and being cared for. He knows that love is there. Alfred nodded, and his eyes seemed to say, “Yes, I feel your hands. I know my foot is there.” At one point, he opened his mouth and said, “Wonderful, wonderful.” Then, he sank back to sleep.

Before we left, we encouraged the family to continue to be with Alfred mindfully. The next day I learned that Alfred passed away just five hours after our visit. This was a kind of gift that belongs to the third category. If you can help people feel safe, less afraid of life, people, and death, you are practicing the third kind of gift.

One might compare the course of human life to the shape of a wave, its beginning and its end. When conditions are sufficient, we perceive the wave, and when conditions are no longer sufficient, we do not perceive the wave. Waves are only made of water. We cannot label the wave as existing or not existing. After what we call the death of the wave, nothing is gone, nothing is lost. The wave has been absorbed into other waves, and somehow, time will bring the wave back again. There is no increasing, decreasing, birth, or death.

When we are dying, if we think that everyone else is alive and we are the only person dying, our feeling of loneliness may be unbearable. But if we are able to visualize hundreds of thousands of people dying with us, our dying may become serene and even joyful. “I am dying in community. Millions of living beings are also dying in this very moment. The energy is one and the same. A millions of living beings die millions of others come to life. All of us are doing this together. Such is mystery of life. When we approach that mystery without fear, sorrow, and pain, we are transformed.

The Second Precept, although it sounds simple, is actually a deep practice. We speak of time, energy, and material resources, but time is not only for energy and material resources. Time is for being with others — being with a dying person or with someone who is suffering. Being really present for even five minutes can be a very important gift. Time is not just to make money. It is to produce the gift of true character and the gift of non-fear.

Coaching Inquiries: How have mindfulness and generosity been connected in your life? What things have you noticed? What in life has noticed you? How have those things evoked generosity so as to make things better for one and all?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


Your last Provision was wonderful, Bob! We enjoyed reading what you made of the time you spent with our boys and the fire. I told Callum what you thought of the fire and we had a nice time remembering the experience together. 

At the moment Callum and Ethan are captured by a family of cardinals that nested in a bush in front of our house, maybe 3 feet from a window where we can watch them. Three eggs recently hatched and we watch both parents deliver meals and fuss over tiny open beaks. They are beautiful creatures and we are enjoying this birds-eye view into their world. 

Thank you for remembering Callum and the fire. We hope and pray that each day brings you healing and blessing in the midst of all the challenges.


In light of your last Provision, you might enjoy the keynote I did last week for 3,000 surgeons which presents mindfulness as part of a suite of 12 commonly used brain states: Keynote Video on Organizing Your Mind. Hang in there! 


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching Internationalwww.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformationwww.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coachingwww.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a TimeOnline Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #857: Mindful Self-Awareness

Laser Provision

Whereas the title of last week’s Provision, Mindless Mindfulness, may have seemed like an oxymoron, that is, a self-contradictory statement, the title of this week’s Provision, Mindful Self-Awareness may seem like a circumlocution, that is, the use of more word than necessary to express an idea. Isn’t all mindfulness a matter of self-awareness? On one level, or course, that goes without saying. On another level, however, putting the two notions in such close proximity expresses an important truth. Read on to see how I wrestle my way through the juxtaposition of such important concepts.

LifeTrek Provision

The dictionary in the sky (dictionary.com) defines Mindfulness as being attentive, aware, heedful, or careful. This definition associates Mindfulness with the notion of having duties. When one has a job to do, it is important to be mindful of one’s responsibilities. The same dictionary associates Self-Awareness with the notion of consciousness and self-realization. One cannot develop as a person until and unless one knows oneself as a person. The two go hand in hand.

For this Provision, I put the two concepts together. Indeed, I might even be willing to go so far as to assert cause and effect. Apart from mindfulness it is impossible to be self-aware. Until and unless one has the quality of being and agency encompassed by mindfulness, self-awareness will never be fully realized. Indeed, we will not even scratch the surface of self-awareness. Mindfulness is that important.

One sense of how that works has to do with the sorting out of what is and what is not. Mindfulness is not just a matter of having a quiet mind, although it is hard to be mindful and distracted with a lot of noise and commotion at the same time. That’s  part of what makes the gurus of mindfulness so distinguished. They are able to maintain a quiet mind even when the whole world is falling apart around them. That’s an art that takes commitment and practice to develop as well as commitment and skill to maintain. The one precedes the other but the commitment remains the same.

The commitment of mindfulness is to be fully conscious, present, and alive in the present moment. And we would live in a very different world if that was the commitment of each and every one of us.

  • Fully Conscious. To be aware of one’s own existence, sensations, thoughts, and surroundings – to mention only four dimensions of life – is to tackle the raison d’être of human life itself. We are not only at the top of the food chain; we are also at the top of the consciousness chain. No other living thing, plant or animal – as far as we know – has as much capacity to understand and appreciate what is going on in the here and now. It has been argued that consciousness has been the driving force of evolution. With each new expression and degree of consciousness, there have been new opportunities for life to come into being. And isn’t that what our life as human beings is all about?

  • Fully Present. For new expressions and degrees of consciousness to take hold of our very being and essence we have, of course, to be fully present. Being distracted does not lead to mindfulness. But how does that level of attentiveness and regard take form in life? It starts with invitation: we invite it to take hold of our spirit. And then we watch as it comes over and forms us into new human beings. Presence will do that to a person: it will transform us into the sensitive and aware people we all hope to be. Presence has no other object or intention. It simply wants to be mindful of what is happening in the here and now. And that something, regardless of its pleasure or pain, is always glorious.

  • Fully Alive. This dimension of mindfulness may seem so straightforward as to be silly. If you are reading these words, then you must be fully alive – right? Wrong! To be fully alive is to have energy, spirit, and vigor. It is to read these words with the interest and desire to grow into your best of all possible selves. And that does not come automatically. It takes commitment, as we have already noted, and it takes a lot more than just a good, balanced diet to keep you going. To really keep you going and growing takes verve, and that too comes under the umbrella of mindfulness. Apart from a vivacious and enthusiastic commitment to learn, we just won’t be living fully in the moment. We won’t be fully alive in the sense that mindfulness as self-awareness invites.

So how do we cultivate that commitment? It starts with a recognition of its importance and value. Until and unless we recognize the importance and value of mindfulness as self-awareness, we will continue to go about our busy-busy lives with all the associated distractions, hubbub, and commotion. We may get a lot of things done but we will not be living from that place of mindful self-awareness. We will not anchored in the ground of being that makes all things possible.

Once we recognize its importance and value, we need to develop practices and approaches to make mindful self-awareness come forward. Some find meditation to be helpful. Others are grounded in prayer. Still others focus on the inward and outward movement of breathing. The breath of life: what a gift.

If you are reading these words then you are alive and you can cultivate mindfulness as self-awareness. What are you thinking right now? Where are you right now? How would you describe your energy right now? There are no correct answers to these questions. There are only your answers to these questions. But any and every answer has its consequences. Some answers make us more mindful and self-aware; others make us less mindful and self-aware.

I, for one, choose more rather than less. I want to think thoughts that open me up rather than close me down. I want to be present in the here and now rather than thinking about the past or worrying about the future. I want to be filled with energy, positive energy, so as to make the best possible contribution in the world. Such are the consequences of mindfulness. Mindfulness is not an end in itself. Mindfulness as self-awareness enables us to be the best we can possibly be in the here and now. And how can we imagine a better reality than that?

Coaching Inquiries: What practices enable you to be fully mindful in the present moment? How could you discover, adopt, and cultivate even better practices? Who could help you to make it so?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


I hope you are doing well and I read your Provisions almost every week. It sounds like your health is stable with continued new realities but those have given you a new perspective. Your last Provision included a good use of the Marion Campbell story. Thanks for the good words in your letters. Mindless Mindfulness – it gives pause.


I am sorry to hear of your recent health challenges. Please know my thoughts and prayers are with you. You have touched my life; even in this recent trust work and our resulting correspondence. I am sure you continue to touch many others – it’s amazing how that works! Thank you for responding to my inquiry. It’s a blessing and honor to hear from you! When I look for Wellcoaches classes to listen to, I always know yours will be rich and informative in many ways. Not only because of the wealth of experience and knowledge you have, but I can hear “things” in your voice and must say it speaks volumes to your wisdom and wonderful spirit.


In Provision #857, Mindless Mindfulness, you really captured the essence of mindfulness. It is in the mindless mindfulness that our true essence emerges. Beautifully written.


I read your Provisions every week. Thank you – you have such a gift to write and share such life-affirming perspectives! This morning “when I swam, I swam!” Thank you. I hope you continue on a path of healing.


I think of you every Sunday when I check my email for my LifeTrek Provision. I am glad you are still fighting the fight!


Your last Provision, Mindless Mindfulness, was beautiful and so true. Thank you.


How do I say thank you! Oh my goodness, your last Provision was such a wonderful appreciation of being in the moment with everything we do and are part of. Can we use that to bring us into the full presence of whatever we are doing in the moment? “When I …., I ……” To be here now, to be in this moment with what I am doing and experiencing. Thank you.


Interesting Boston sidelight: http://www.businessinsider.com/ryan-hall-meb-boston-marathon-2014-4


Your last Provision was very nice. Yes, Celebrate what’s right is a wonderful video and you did a marvelous job describing why it is so good.


So “when I weave, I weave” is actually harnessing our best natural ability. Wonderful insight. Our brains are proven to work best when focused on a single task because in fact that is what it does. It simply switches back and forth very rapidly when we think we are “doing two things at once.” I learned this from a very rudimentary hands-on exhibit at the Buffalo Museum of Science when I was a kid.


We have exchanged emails before, Bob, regarding the Evocative Coaching Training Program and my interest in coaching. I will follow this up sometime soon. However, I wanted/needed to tell you that I followed up Dewitt’s film, watched it with wonder, delight and thoughtfulness, forwarded it to my partner who has also been positively touched by it. And I am forwarding to others… Thank you both for sharing such a precious gift.


One of my first early marathons was in 09 In Baltimore. You were the Pacer group leader. You taught my friend Brenda and I all about the joy, breathing , stretching, walking backwards and sideways every mile. It changed my life. I have been running marathons ever since, and have utilized your techniques on almost every run and definitely every long run. Thank you for your guidance. 

Yesterday I ran the Blue Ridge Marathon in Roanoke. It was my 22nd State. I am trying to run all 50 states. I went to this marathon without any of my teammates. They all had done Virginia already. I saw a man at this marathon with wings on his hat, and he really seemed like he knew what he was doing. He seemed to be at real ease with the run and who I imagined had run tons of marathons. I was a little intimated about the hills and elevation gain, but I focused on this man and followed him for at least four miles until he finally said something to me and we started talking. It turns out he is your good friend, Jim, that you helped become a runner a long time ago. He kept talking about you and finally it hit me……that’s Bob! The Baltimore Pacer!

Tell Jim I finished the marathon and his kindness helped a lot. After running about to the half, we split up. But I will never forget that marathon, and the spirit of joy that came from people who care about others. Your efforts have touched more than you will ever know. I have already gotten my daughter, my Sister and her two kids, local running friends and business associates and a whole bunch at my office to run full and half marathons. Running has been my joy throughout some very difficult times… Jim did not know, but I had lost someone very dear to me a couple months ago. The marathon was one of the few things that kept me together in recent days……

Jim shared with me your health challenge. My heart is with you. I hope you get to run Baltimore with your family, as Jim mentioned you were considering another marathon. I bet Jim will go with you!


I just finished the toughest marathon, the Blue Ridge Marathon, I have ever run! I won’t say how long it took me, nor will I confess that I spent 40 minutes in the EMS tent afterwards. Thanks to my loving and supportive wife, Kathy, for being there and for being patient with me. They did pulse, BP and EKG twice, just to be safe – results were excellent both times. I was just nauseated. The course was absolutely brutal – it surely deserves its title! I had no idea what 7400 ft of elevation gain meant. And the temp was near 80 at the finish.

I was great at the half-way point, at the top of Mill Mountain. I thought it was all down hill from there, and in a manner of speaking it was! The course through the suburbs in the foothills and up to Peakwood were the worst. They were like trying to run up a ladder! Anyway, I will never run the Blue Ridge Marathon again. I told Kathy I’d sign a statement to that effect! Thanks to all for your wishes and prayers. I really needed them! The best part of the run involves a story about meeting someone who knows my friend Bob. (Ed. Note: So glad the two of you met up. What an amazing coincidence! I did 5+ miles today. A marathon is a long ways away, but I can’t wait to run one with you, Jim, just so long as it’s an easier course that Blue Ridge Mountain!) 


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching Internationalwww.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformationwww.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coachingwww.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a TimeOnline Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #856: Mindless Mindfulness

Laser Provision

I know the title of today’s Provision sounds like an oxymoron, but it’s true: there’s no way to be mindful unless one is mindless; by that I mean, one has to empty one’s mind of everything else in order to fill one’s mind with just one thing: a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment. The key is to not only experience awareness but acceptance as well. This Provision provides a pathway for making it so.

LifeTrek Provision

Today has been a glorious spring in Williamsburg. The dogwoods and the azaleas, for which our neighborhood is famous, are in full bloom. The white, pink, and red flowers are everywhere, including in our own yard. My wife Megan and I spent the day in the garden, weeding and cleaning out winter debris,   moving things around to suit our fancy, and spreading mulch. We could not have picked a better day to be outside and to enjoy the wonders of spring.

It is amazing to me how meditative it can be to work work with and in the earth. To pile up a wheelbarrow with a pitch fork and then to spread around the mulch with a rake and one’s hands: everything else leaves one’s mind. At that moment, the sky above and the ground below is all we know. And it is beautiful.

As we finished up our work for the day, Megan remembered one of our favorite inspirational videos: Celebrate What’s Right With the World by Dewitt Jones, a world-famous photographer who has seen the connection between capturing an image on film and and making the most of it in our lives. Indeed, making the most of it is the key to capturing the image on film in the first place. If one doesn’t expect to see what’s right with the world one never will see what’s right with the world. Our expectations influence and can even determine our perceptions. The two go hand in hand.

In his video, Dewitt tells the story of Marion Campbell, a seasoned weaver in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides. She was, in fact, esteemed as the finest weaver in all of Scotland, regarded as a national, and cited treasure by the Queen. Marion lived in the tiny town of Plockrapool and Dewitt had been asked to photograph her for National Geographic magazine. Here is how Dewitt tells the experience of their encounter:

“I went to her house and knocked on her door. She came out…lovely woman…and she said, “Can I help you?” And I said, “Yeah. I’m from National Geographic and I want to photograph you. And she said, ” Wait. My brother is very sick upstairs. He may be dying, and I’m taking care of him.”

I felt like a complete idiot. I began to apologize, I backed off and she stopped me and said, “Wait, wait. Give me an hour and I’ll be ready. And she closed the door. So I went off and wandered around the village thinking of the extraordinary presence of this woman. Why, when her brother was dying, would she give me time?

When I came back, I heard the hand shuttle bring thrown across her loom. And I found her in her weaving shed lit only be the light of the window. And she showed me the yarn that she’d spun by hand. And she told me how she’s gone into the fields and scraped the lichens off the rock to make her dyes. Amazing. But I was still nervous and embarrassed so I took a few quick photographs and said, “Thank you, thank you. Fine, I’ve got it.” And I started to leave.

But again she stopped me and took me into her house. She put out biscuits for us and she’d made some tea. And she wouldn’t eat until I had eaten. Then she invited me into her living room and she stoked the peat fire and we sat together. She talked quietly and simply and I kept thinking that I was in the presence of a great sage. And I was waiting for some gift of wisdom.

So finally I said, “What do you think about when you weave?” She said, “I wonder if I’ll run out of thread.” It wasn’t exactly what I thought I would hear. She must have seen my discomfort because she smiled at me, cocked her head and said, “When I weave, I weave.”

Without any pretence or coaching, in that simple statement Marion Campbell captured the essence of mindless mindfulness. What do you think about when you weave? “I wonder if I’ll run out of thread. When I weave I weave.” She isn’t thinking about anything else. All distractions have left her mind – that’s the mindless part – and she becomes totally engaged in the weaving that gives her such comfort, joy, and pride – that’s the mindful part. She becomes one with not only what she is doing but how it connects with her identity as well.

That is my experience of writing Provisions or even, if you can believe it, of mulching the garden. “When I mulch, I mulch.” There’s nothing else to think about. There’s nothing else to do except to move around, pitch and spread out the mulch. It is an experience of mindless mindfulness, and it is wonderful. That’s why I hope you can find and celebrate such experiences in your own life, as often as possible.

Coaching Inquiries: What helps you to get into that quality of being known as mindless mindfulness? What is your “weaving” or “mulching”, your activity or engagement that helps you to transcend the moment and to be one with it all? How could you get into that space more fully and frequently in the days ahead? Who could help you to do so?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


Thank you for your message today. It is amazing how we soon learn that we are not in control. Cancer did that for me. I have learned to be attuned to every aspect around me and to appreciate each day of progress and those who have assisted me along life’s journey. Enjoy every moment of yours!!!


Thanks for this Povision, Bob, and for all your messages of hope and healing. May Christ’s resurrection be yours this year – in whatever form that may take for you. Blessings! 


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching Internationalwww.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformationwww.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coachingwww.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a TimeOnline Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #855: Control is an Illusion

Laser Provision

There was a time when I thought I had everything under control. My schedule. My mind. My emotions. My running. My routines. My health. In other words, my life. Then it all came unglued. In the twinkling of an eye, it was as though I was living someone else’s life. I went from being on top of the world to barely hanging onto the world at all. But with the help of my family and friends, the incredible world of medicine, and the wondrous Spirit of life, I am alive with a simple message for this week’s Provision: control is an illusion.

LifeTrek Provision

It’s a natural part of life for animals, and even plants, to seek to exercise a measure of control over their environments. That’s why plants bend toward the light. Indeed, there’s at least one plant that does more than bend. When we were in Costa Rica we saw a “walking” tree. This tree, with a gnarl of stringy roots above ground that look like a bunch of bamboo shoots, can move in the direction of the light by dying off and releasing the roots that are keeping it in the shade as it throws out and anchors new roots that move it toward the sun. Pretty cool.

Animals, of course, have much more mobility and, therefore, a natural tendency to want to control even more aspects of our environment. That’s why we build home and office buildings, with heat and air-conditioning, with desks and chairs, with toilets and showers, with closets and vanities – indeed, with whatever our hearts desire, within the limits of our budgets, to make life more pleasurable and attractive.

In short, we want to control a great many things. We don’t enjoy being at the mercy of the elements. That can even be dangerous. Animals need to shelter ourselves in safe, protective places. Birds build nests, deer hunker down in grassy bedding, and turtles sleep in their shells both under water and on rocks, in the warmth of the sun. Sleep is, indeed, a universal bodily need of all animals. And if we fail to get enough sleep, we are soon to suffer negative consequences in terms of both our physical and mental health.

That was a hard lesson for me to learn. I love to work hard and long. That was true before I got sick and it is still true today. Some people are just made that way. It’s hard for me to get off the productivity treadmill in order to sleep. But I am learning to make sleep happen. One might say that I have come to see sleep as a part of my work. It’s what I need to do in order to heal my brain so as to make a contribution in the world. So I’m learning slowly to jump on the sleep bandwagon. It just has to happen.

And in order for sleep to happen properly I have to control just about every aspect of my environment. I have to control the temperature in the room, the firmness of what I lie down on, the light around me, the sounds I can hear, as well as my sense of safety – to mention only five important elements that all animals have to attend to in one fashion or another.

So we seek to control things for the sake of our health and well-being. And it is certainly important to control as much as we can. But I have learned the hard way that control is an illusion. We can easily lose our grip on all the things we do – physical, financial, relational, emotional, spiritual – to control our environments. Indeed, we never really controlled them in the first place. We just thought we did and we acted accordingly. We had a sense of being in charge of our lives and, as a consequence, we may or may not have given others their due.

But that is not the right way to live, because control is an illusion and one never knows when we’re going to need a helping hand. We never know when things are going to come unraveled and need to be tied together. We never know when chaos is likely to break out and a rabbit needs to be pulled out of that proverbial hat. We never know, in other words, when we’re going to need someone to help us regain whatever measure of control is possible.

That’s why it’s important to go through life with a humble and generous spirit. What goes around comes around, as they say, and there will come a day when each and every one of us will need others to extend that spirit to us. Each and every one of is going to die one of these days, so why not start right now to pay attention to the things that matter?

Mindfulness enables us to take that consideration into account. By being attentive, aware, and careful as we go through life, by getting quiet and taking stock of what is going on around and inside us, by pausing to reflect on both the meaning of life and on our place in the grand scheme of things, we restore and guide our souls.

Don’t those words give you a different feel than the concept of control? To attend to life, to appreciate what is going on around us, and to reflect on the very depths of life itself: that is what mindfulness means. And it gives us a tremendous gift; it frees us from trying to control everything since it gives us the true perspective that control is an illusion. Control can be taken away from us in an instant. And when that happens, as it will for us all, the deeper question is whether or not we are able to cope with and esteem the things that are going on.

I know that such coping and esteeming has been a struggle for me, but my family and friends have consistently encouraged me to value even the things in life that are out of my control. Life is here and I am still part of the equation. So even though control may be an illusion, that is not reason for discouragement or despair. We can live in the moment without trying to control things – past, present, or future – so as to enjoy all life has to offer. And isn’t that the point of it all anyway?

Coaching Inquiries: Is your life under control? What would your life look like if that control fell apart? Who could you count on to pick up the pieces and carry you through? How could you cultivate the most positive and strengthening of relationships possible? Why not find a partner or coach right now, to walk with you through the journey?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


Thank you for your recent posting, Live Your Values, reminding me of the turbulent era that required each of us to find our inner truth during the Vietnam war years. I grew up in a military family; my father was a staunch hawk, officer and Air Force pilot. We had a militaristic upbringing of strictness and respect, no matter what. 

As I grew into my teen years, living in the San Francisco Bay area in the mid 60’s, I saw many of my friends taking their stands, including my older brother. I observed all sides with friends who didn’t register, went underground, burned their draft cards in public, or decided to enter the war. I watched hundreds of young men leave for the war at Travis AFB where my father was stationed and worked at the flight-line. 

At that time, I married a man who left his officer status to defect to Canada when they activated him to Vietnam. Years later I married a man who served as an air force officer during those war years. My heart aches for the ones who went and were spit on when they returned. I now have years of perspective to be able to draw no conclusions or judgments for anyone’s personal decisions.

Had I been a young man in that era I am not certain in which way I would have chosen to resist the killing that would have been required of me in ‘serving my country’. Today I have set my intention on compassion for all, no matter what they chose.

Editor’s Note: I registered for the draft during those years as a conscientious objector. I was willing to go and help the wounded but not to kill. Fortunately, the war ended just as I might have been called. What a gift. It enabled me to meet Megan, the love of my life, and to do what I can to help the world. Thanks for sharing your own journey of “helping” with me and the readers of Provisions.


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching Internationalwww.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformationwww.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coachingwww.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a TimeOnline Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #854: Live Your Values

Laser Provision

Two weeks ago I encouraged you to Live with Purpose and to make that purpose constructive. Amen to that. But what does a constructive purpose look like? Although the specifics vary from person to person, the overreaching sweep of a constructive purpose is based upon a common set of core values that transcend personality, culture, and even history itself. Most of recognize and understand those values; the challenge is to muster the courage to live accordingly. This Provision is designed to help you do just that.

LifeTrek Provision

As a teenager, I was an active part of the Boy Scouts of America. We had weekly meetings, went on monthly campouts, and fostered a strong set of values. In fact, those values continue to this very day. They are summarized in the Scout Law, namely, that a Scout is Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, and Reverent. Although I have not been a part of scouting since those early days, those 12 values still sound pretty good to me and are still a part of scouting today.

It’s not easy to live by those values. It’s never been easy and it may be even harder today. Living by those values starts, of course, with claiming those values. P5: Live eople can have different values, or no values at all, and it’s important for a person to know what’s important. They do not have to be those 12 in order to be good values. But they do have to express and contribute to a positive sense of purpose. That’s what my Provision, Live with Purpose, was all about: defining what makes for a life-giving purpose and exploring how to get there. The two go hand-in-hand: the destination and the map.

Today I want to explore that notion a little further, with help from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and a former President of the United States, Jimmy Carter. The Dalai Lama is currently participating in a two-day conference in Kyoto, Japan, sponsored by the Mind & Life Institute, titled “Mapping the Mind: A Dialogue Between Scientists and Contemplative Scholars-Practitioners”. If you have about 30 minutes, I encourage you to watch his presentation on YouTube (you can skip through the first 10 and a half minutes of introductory remarks to get right to his presentation).

HH the Dalai Lama makes a simple point: if we fail to live life-giving values then we fail to live at all. The two go hand-in-hand. And what are life-giving values? Here are the ones mentioned by HH the Dalai Lama: love, compassion, forgiveness, protection, tolerance, companionship, contentment, mindfulness, and respect for life (all life, including nature). Now that’s a tough bunch of values to live out and express adequately, let alone fully, but they are worth aiming for and striving to our best in realizing. Who wouldn’t want to live in that kind of world?

One person who set his sights on being that kind of person was former US President, Jimmy Carter. Regardless of what you think of his politics, its impossible to impugn his character. And that character expressed itself the day after he took office on January 20, 1977. With the sweep of his pen, he took an action that proved to be one of the most controversial things he ever did: he pardoned the so-called draft dodgers who escaped into Canada. And he did that before he even began to walk down toward the Oval Office for the very first time. It was, he notes in his memoirs, just the right thing to do. He took a lot criticism, obviously, because many folks thought the draft dodgers should be executed for treason and so forth. But once it was within his power to do so, he lived his values in the best way he knew how: he showed, mercy, understanding, and compassion. The same values extolled by HH the Dalai Lama.

Carter’s action was no small matter. An estimated 210,000 men were accused of draft violations, and about 25,000 of them were indicted. Many never registered for the draft at all. Tens of thousands of Americans left the country during the Vietnam War, most of them to Canada, although no one knows the exact number — Canadian officials didn’t ask immigrants about their draft status or keep records. Others fled to Mexico, or Sweden, or went underground in the United States. Some left after their draft numbers came up, some preempted the draft and left, and still others were students exempt from the draft but who left as a symbol of opposition to the war.

The pardon granted by President Carter meant that the United States could not prosecute those who hadn’t registered or those who had unlawfully resisted the draft. However, the government did not pardon those who had deserted or been dishonorably discharged, or protesters who had engaged in any violence. Carter’s pardon was criticized from both directions. Many people, including veterans groups, were dismayed that draft dodgers wouldn’t be fully punished. Civil liberties groups wanted to see deserters given full reprieve.

Despite the pardon, thousands of draft dodgers remained in Canada. They went on to become architects, lawyers, musicians, professors, reporters, and even officials in the Canadian government. In the 1970s, a senior aide to Canada’s Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau hired a draft dodger for a top cabinet position, and felt no need to mention that information to the Prime Minister. The aide said: “He was cleared by security, he had Canadian citizenship by then, and he had not committed any Canadian crime.”

One famous draft dodger was jazz musician Bill King. During the Vietnam War, he was living in New York and working as the music director for Janis Joplin’s band. Four days after getting married, his draft number was called. He reported for duty on a day of national anti-war protests, so when he showed up at Fort Dix in New Jersey, everyone was on high alert. Twice the military police pulled King over and hassled him for having too much facial hair.

King was scheduled to leave on a 5 a.m. flight for Saigon, but the guesthouse was full so they refused to extend King the customary courtesy of letting his wife spend the night with him. King decided in that moment, then and there, to leave for Canada. He and his wife were smuggled out of the base under blankets by a sympathetic young man, and from there they hitchhiked to Canada. King went on to work with many of the leading rock and jazz musicians of his day, publish the international magazine The Jazz Report, and serve as artistic director for the Toronto Beaches Jazz Festival.

King’s story was just one of countless stories growing out of that crazy era in American history. If anything good came from that time, it was the 26th Amendment to the Constitution which lowered the voting age to 18 in 1971. There was just no way to deny the truth behind those countless anti-war marches that were filled with the slogan: “Old Enough to Fight, Old Enough to Vote!”  And so it happened.

I would encourage you to make it happen as well. Know your values. Claim your values. Live your values. HH the Dalai Lama is right: if we fail to live that way, we fail to live at all.

Coaching Inquiries: How would you describe your values? What ranks at the top? How do they express themselves in your life? In what ways do they contribute to the betterment of life on planet earth? Who could help you align your values more fully?

 


Your last Provision, with the analogy to dancing, made me smile all over. I am a dancer and I have finally found a partner with whom I can not only dance but share a life. It’s so Godly that we found each other and so amazing that we both share the same amazing passion for dancing. Given the analogy in your last Provision, I just had to share. Thanks!


Love your last Provision on the gifts children bring to the adult world was magical. How great to be able to sit at the feet of angels!


I sooo enjoyed your last Provisions about seeing things through a child’s eyes. So “right on!” We have had 4 wonderful children and we now have 7 grandchildren. When I cook, I recall wonderful times when one of those kids were right beside me in the kitchen, making something yummy. And when I use one of my Mom’s handwritten recipes, it is like having her right beside me. Or when I work out in the garden I remember when we were all doing that together. I caught butterflies with my kids and we pinned them to boards. We got out field guide books and identified trees, flowers and birds and I am still doing that today. We camped lots. Your messages mean a lot to me. You are doing a very good thing, impacting many peoples’ lives for good and for God. Your thoughts matter! Thanks.


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching International, www.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformation, www.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coaching, www.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time, Online Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #853: It Looks Like Dancing

Laser Provision

Some of the most precious observations come out of the mouths of very young children. That happened at our house recently, when my wife and I entertained friends with two young boys, ages 2 and 4. The four-year-old helped me to build a fire in the fireplace. After it got going and the licks of fire were going up around the logs he stepped back from the heat and said, “It looks like dancing.” His dad and I looked at each other and could only smile. Mindfulness 101. Perfect. I hope you enjoy my reflections.

LifeTrek Provision

It’s always quite an experience to build a campfire or to make a fire in the fireplace with the help of very young children. The combination of danger and mystery could not be more fresh or true. They can feel the intense heat of the fire, so they know there is reason to be careful. They know there is reason to be mindful. But they are also drawn to the allure and magic of its mystery.

Perhaps you have experienced that magic yourself. I know I have. There is something enchanting about sitting around a campfire with family and friends, in silence, on a starry night, hearing the sticks crackling and watching the embers burn down slowly. If you have never had that opportunity then you don’t know what you’re missing. It’s one of my wife’s and and my favorite pastimes. I encourage you to give it a try.

In my case, it started young. My parents had me involved with groups that took children and youth camping on a regular basis. The first group, when I was very young, was a father-son organization. We went on those outings together regularly. Later, as I got older, I was involved with Boy Scouts and church camps that had us staying outside, over night, in tents or cabins. My Boy Scout troop prided itself on going out once a month, regardless of the weather: rain or shine, hot or cold. There were some pretty rough nights in those hot, sticky, stinky tents.

Regardless of how sticky or stinky things got, however, it was nevertheless always worth going out because of the campfire that ended each day. We would have fun building the fire, telling stories, and watching the fire slowly burn down as we arranged and rearranged the logs to keep things burning along. Both my wife and I still love that magical way to end the day.

There’s no better word to describe the experience than “magical”. It is truly an enchanting experience and that fact was brought home to me recently in a most delightful way. My wife and I had company over for dinner and, afterwards, we started a fire in the fireplace. Our friends’ two young boys, ages 2 and 4, were delightfully mystified.

Oh, to see things with such fresh eyes. It is so easy for adults to forget that time when everything was fresh and new. When we had not always “been there and done that”. When we were learning, up close and personal, not only how the world worked but also how to talk about how the world worked. Or even how to talk at all. Having young children around brought that all back in a flash.

It was so much fun, and so automatic, to reinforce the learning of language with these boys. They would see or say something and their experience would be reinforced immediately by both their parents and or my my wife and me. It was automatic. No one had to tell us, as adults, “Now help the children learn the words for things. Help the children learn how to talk.” We just did it. It came naturally. It was the way we all learned when we were children and it is the way we pass on our knowledge, generation after generation.

That’s one of the great gifts that children bring to the adult world: they help us to see things again through fresh eyes. I’m getting to experience that this week as my wife attends a professional meeting and I have the opportunity to stay with my 20-month old grandson. What fun. And also what an experience in mindfulness. Whenever I am playing or walking with him, especially up and down stairs, I am on high alert. I am paying close attention to make sure he is even as he explores this new world all around him.

What a combination. High alert and playfulness. I love the way that makes me feel and I hope we can all learn to bring that into our lives. When we do, the entire world will look like it’s dancing.

Coaching Inquiries: What thrills your heart? When do you notice the magic and mystery of life? How could you come closer to that reality? Who could coach and assist you to do so? Why not contact LifeTrek Coaching today for a free consultation?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation. To learn more about LifeTrek Coaching programs, Click Here.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


I am inspired through my Wellcoaches Study, you and your Provisions, and also the small amount I know regarding your outreach specifically as it relates to education. It is my goal to be a certified Wellcoaches Health Coach by March. I then look forward to impacting the world with the gift of Health Coaching. You inspire me. So does the story Logan Laplante, a 13 year-old boy who was taken out of the education system to be home schooled instead.

Not only was he home schooled, but Logan had the ability to tailor his education to his interests and also his style of learning, something traditional education does not offer. As Logan has mentioned, when he grows up he wants to be happy and healthy. Your readers might be interested in watching this TEDx talk that he gave in 2013, where he discussed how hacking his education is helping him achieve that goal. Thanks for the thoughtful Provision, Time to Stand Still.


Your last Provision, Live With Purpose, reminded me of a poem that Leslie and I included in our wedding over 30 years ago, The Master Speed by Robert Frost. I attach a picture of our framed remembrance of this message to often stand still, together “wing to wing and oar to oar.” This was a relevant metaphor for Leslie and me as we were very active canoeing the whitewater Potomac River below and above Great Falls, VA! Your great Provision message rings true for us every day:

The Master Speed

No speed of wind or water rushing by
But you have speed far greater. You can climb
Back up a stream of radiance to the sky,
And back through history up the stream of time.
And you were given this swiftness, not for haste
Nor chiefly that you may go where you will,
But in the rush of everything to waste,
That you may have the power of standing still-
Off any still or moving thing you say.
Two such as you with such a master speed
Cannot be parted nor be swept away
From one another once you are agreed
That life is only life forevermore
Together wing to wing and oar to oar


My friend and colleague, Kerul Kassel, has written a wonderful new book titled The Thinking Executive’s Guide to Sustainability. What could be more important? Here is a brief description:

“We live in an increasingly global economy in which the effects of shrunken economies, broadened communication, and widespread meteorological incidents associated with climate change are leaving virtually no one untouched. As a result, a working knowledge of concepts such as the triple bottom line and sustainability, have become mandatory,

The Thinking Executive’s Guide to Sustainability offers a practical, relevant, and easily grasped overview of sustainability issues and the systems logic that informs them, supported by empirical research and applied to corporate rationales, decision-making, and business processes. Intended for business professionals seeking concise, reliable, and current knowledge and trends, it will support them in leading their organizations’ corporate sustainability, social responsibility, and citizenship efforts so they can remain competitive and successful.”


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching International, www.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformation, www.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coaching, www.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time, Online Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #852: Live with Purpose

Laser Provision

It’s hard to live life without a sense of purpose. I know. I’ve tried it, involuntarily, and life is neither as productive nor as fun without that sense. What’s your life purpose? Have you dusted it off lately and made sure it is up to date? Do you keep it in mind? This Provision will not only challenge you to do so, it will equip you to do so as well. I invite you to read on and to reflect with me on the matter of purpose. Who knows, something new may just emerge both for you and for me!

LifeTrek Provision

The ancient Epicureans were famous for their ethic of pleasure. Indeed, they viewed pleasure as the point of life itself. Of course they also believed that the way to pleasure was not to “eat, drink, and be merry” but to live modestly, to get educated in the ways of the world, and to limit one’s desires. The bottom-line and raison d’être for such restraint, however, was pleasure. Apart from deriving happiness from life, Epicureans found no reason to go on living at all.

That was, in part, because they did not believe in a world beyond the physical world. From their point of view, this world was the only thing that we could be sure of and, therefore, the best basis upon which to ground our lives. They became famous, therefore, for the epitaph that was engraved upon many of their tombstones: “Non fui, fui, non sum, non curo.” (I was not; I was; I am not; I do not care.)

Now I don’t know about you, but that just doesn’t ring my bell. I understand and appreciate the flow of time. The dictum, “I was not; I was; I am not.” is the story of us all. It’s a mere statement of fact. We are born, have our moment in the sun, if you will, and then we die.” It’s hard to get anything more basic or universal than that. That’s true not only for every living thing on this planet but also for the planet itself. Nothing in the material world exists without a beginning, middle, and end. That is, if you will, the flow of things.

It’s understandable, then, that some people would go from such an obvious fact to such an oblivious attitude. When they look only on the surface of life and focus only on themselves – on their own, individual existence – it’s not only easy to become nonchalant, it’s almost inevitable. Ho, hum. It is what it is. Here today, gone tomorrow. Who cares. But that’s no way to live. At least that’s no way to live so as to be filled with the most amount of pleasure possible.

That may be ironic, but caring for others is the best way to care for oneself and to bring oneself pleasure. And that’s where I differ most from the Epicureans. They, too, recognized that hedonism would not result in true, lasting happiness. But what did they substitute in its place? Stoicism, education, and self-denial. As much as I admire self-control, education, and self-discipline, they are not, in and of themselves, sufficient for a rich and fulfilling life. There has to be some fun along the way and there also has to be a sense of purpose.

What is life without such a sense of purpose? As far as I can imagine, it’s either aimless or destructive – two qualities that simply do not contribute to or build up the human community.

My guess is that you agree with that simple statement. The real challenge is not to affirm that a sense of purpose is important but to keep that sense of purpose in mind over time and to make that purpose constructive. And that’s where mindfulness comes into the equation. Mindfulness is not just a matter of staying calm and being aware of what is happening in the present moment; it is a matter of being aware of how one is interfacing with the present moment and impacting the well-being of others.

With that understanding and from that place of mindfulness, all manner of things become possible. It opens up our hearts and minds to many possibilities. Mindfulness pays attention to our thoughts, feelings, and desires so as to connect them in caring ways with others. And that’s the best kind of purpose to have.

It can, of course, take many forms. From the smallest of one-on-one interactions, to small family and community groupings, to large-scale assemblies, it is possible to live with purpose. Indeed, most of us do so in one fashion or another. But we do not always do so mindfully and carefully. It is easy to go through our routines without those dimensions. I encourage you, however, to adopt a different stance and approach in life. I encourage you to care and to hold caring consistently in your awareness.

Choosing to care is where it starts. My guess is that most people do that. But to hold caring consistently in our awareness? Now that’s another matter altogether and it’s a matter that calls for mindfulness. Mindfulness takes us beyond Epicureanism to enthusiasm so as to live with that constructive purpose.

Do you know the root meaning of the word, “enthusiasm”? I’m sure I’ve noted it before. The word “enthusiasm” comes from the ancient Greek word, “en-theos”, a word that literally means “to be filled with God”. However you may understand the spirit of life that abides in and flows through each of us, two things are certain: you are alive and you will have both good times and bad times in life. There’s no way around that. That’s the deal, once we are born into this world.

But one thing that is not certain is whether or not you are going to live with any sense of purpose, let alone with a positive sense of purpose. Those dimensions of life require choice; and I encourage you to choose life. Stop going through the motions. When you wake up in the morning, get oriented and figure out at least one thing you can do to make things better on this old planet of ours. It doesn’t matter how or for whom or what. Just set out to make things better.

Then be mindful of that choice as often as possible throughout the day. It’s amazing what happens when mindfulness takes over our lives in this way. It fills us with a sense of purpose and it transforms our attitudes as well as our actions. That’s the underlying power of mindfulness: transformation. We don’t have to work at it. We just have to pay attention and allow our natural way of being – our natural caring – to express itself more fully in order to make life better for one and for all. Why not make the choice today?

Coaching Inquiries: How would you describe your sense of purpose? In what ways does it contribute to your own well-being, the well-being of others, and the well-being of the planet? How can you enhance your sense of purpose? Who can assist you to make it happen?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation. To learn more about LifeTrek Coaching programs, Click Here.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


I’m enjoying your Provisions. Just checking in to see if you’ll be visiting my part of the world again this year. I would love to see you and Megan again!


I’m not sure I have told you—or have told you lately, in any case—how meaningful and peaceful a part of my Sunday morning your Provisions are. I read them along with my first cup of coffee in the silence of an early Sunday. They consistently move me to gratitude and appreciation for all I have, for all that is possible. Even though your recovery from your coma is miraculous, I also see that you were meant to do the work you are doing, and we needed you here to do it. Thank you for sharing all of it; I am the richer for it.


Very good to hear that you are doing better. Thanks for the nice things you shared in your “brush with death” Provision. Well done.


Thanks for your last Provision. Wonderful and inspiring message as always. I had a bout with Hep C and went through the 11-month treatment with interferon and other drugs. During the time, I was fortunate enough to “re-mission” my life. I’ve made it simple. I wrote on a 3 x 5 card, “Make a difference”. That might sound trite, but it’s not. It’s what now guides my everyday actions. The idea of an opportunity to re-mission has become central to my teaching of leadership to future school leaders. Thanks again and wishing you many blessings.


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching International, www.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformation, www.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coaching, www.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time, Online Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #851: To Die and Live Again

Laser Provision

At one point in my crazy brain inflammation I was about far gone as you can get and still be alive. I had no reaction to physical pain. My only physical reaction was the pupil of one eye. Shine a bright light into that eye, but not both, and the pupil would constrict. Since my brain was seizing uncontrollably I had to be put into a medically-induced coma for three weeks. It was a scary time for my family and, as you know if you have been reading my writing, my daughter was a critical part of figuring out how to save my life. I’m thankful for that and I’m glad that I am able to write this Provision, reflecting a bit more on what’s like to survive such a close encounter with death. I invite you to join me on the journey.

LifeTrek Provision

This has been a difficult and unsettling season in our lives. That said, it has also been a time for giving thanks and praise. We are glad that it has been a season in rather than the end of my life. The end of my physical existence on this planet could have well happened. I could well have been seized by life, as we all will be sooner or later, and shaken so hard as to die. But for whatever reason, both physically and metaphysically, that did not happen. I came close to death and then came back to life. What an opportunity! What a life-changing experience! What a joyous wonder! What a blessing to be not only alive but to be functional as well. None of that was guaranteed. But the gift was given and for that we are thankful.

My family and I have always lived with an attitude or gratitude. We have always viewed life as a gift rather than as an entitlement. And that’s a good perspective for one and all to take. It’s good to be grateful and gracious on the trek of life. When we think of life as an entitlement, it’s easy to become suspicious of and demanding with others. But those qualities do not make for a good way in the world. They fill us with both anger and regret as we push our way forward. Simply put, they make us hard to be around.

I should know because, of everyone in my family, that “my-way-or-else” orientation and approach can take hold of my soul at times, especially when I want to get something done. My way is, after all, the “right way” and, when necessary, I am not afraid of doing things that are improper, inappropriate, or even outrageous to make that way happen. Just ask my daughter-in-law. She is all too aware of how “dangerous” it is to be around me at those moments. There’s just no telling what I might do to make things happen, once I get an idea in my head.

Such assertiveness has always been a part of my personality and it can still raise its head rather easily. But things have changed a bit since I came so close to death. Not only am I more thankful to be alive, I am also more interested in the lives of others. My attitude is less “my way or the highway” and more “how can I support you on the trek of life?”. That is, of course, the frame of coaching as a profession. But it has now become more or less the overarching frame of my life as well. I like that that has happened and other people tell me they like that as well. I’m easier to be around and more evocative of other people’s strengths. I am, in other words, more of the person I have always wanted to be.

It’s curious that it took such a life-shattering, life-shaping experience to get me there (and I still have a lot to learn). But that has been the journey I am on and who knows where it will go. One thing is certain: to die and live again leaves a person changed forever. For better or for worse, everything is touched and nothing comes out the same.

I think and hope that I am changing for the better. I still have a long way to go but I notice that I am already a little different. I walk slower. I look around more. I make more mistakes. And I am more considerate of others. Let’s consider each of those qualities in turn.

I walk slower. This one is a no brainer. I walk slower because I want to be sure that my left foot is planted securely. That is the foot that always turns in and gives out, if I have any seizure activity at all. Never the right foot. Always the left. So I take care to make sure that everything is set with my left foot before moving forward. I do that especially when I am running. Step. Look. Secure. Breathe. Go. Walking is the same way. Step. Look. Secure. Breathe. Go. The way I walk and move has changed after coming back to life.

I look around more. My experience of the natural world itself has also changed. What a joy it is to be alive. It’s incredible what you can see just by looking. On Thursday I saw the moon in the middle of the day. I would have probably not noticed that before. But now I do. I am writing this Provision while sitting in a hotel restaurant in Charlottesville, Virginia. I’m here while my wife is at a conference because I wanted to connect with and give thanks to the doctors and staff at a hospital here who helped to save my life, especially one doctor in particular with whom I became particularly close. Looking out the window, I notice trees starting to bud, gardens starting to sprout their wares, rabbits starting to hop, and people starting to do whatever it is in their personalities lead them to do as the world wakes up. Fascinating.

I make more mistakes. It may be, of course, that I made just as many mistakes before but I never noticed them. I doubt that, especially when it comes to speaking. But my brain inflammation expresses itself in many ways and one of the ways that I notice is the selection and pronunciation of words. For someone who was always a word master, this aspect of dying and living again is particularly troubling. But it is what it is. As with my walking, sometimes my talking – and typing on the keyboard, for that matter – has to be slower in order to come out right. Maybe we would all benefit from this “slow and steady” approach to life. I know it is helping me to deal with and to manage my mistakes.

I am more considerate of others. This one is across the board. I will go out of my way to make sure someone is alright if I think they are struggling or suffering. I also seem to not foist myself upon people and situations with the same reckless abandon as I did before. I look around more, as I have said, and I then do my best to care for and meet the needs of others. That’s especially important with my shy grandson. I think he has now caught onto the fact that I am part of his world, but my slower approach makes a big difference in the time it takes for him to warm up to me. I wait for him to come around to me, rather than the other way around. Go slow to go fast. Things usually work out better this way. It turns out that he’s not as shy as he may, at first, appear.

I’m sure there are many other lessons to be learned from coming so close to death and then to live again, but those four came immediately to mind. Perhaps you can imagine a few others yourself. If so, I would invite you to reply to this Provision and to send those thoughts to me. They may be exactly what I need at this point on my trek of life.

Coaching Inquiries: What challenges have you faced in your life and how have they changed you? What opportunities have you had to look over the brink between life and death and how have you experienced them? Have they been exciting, scary, confusing, or sorrowful? What might be the attitude that life is now calling for from you in the here and now?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation. To learn more about LifeTrek Coaching programs, Click Here.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


As I was heading out for our NVC Williamsburg meeting three things came to mind. I wasn’t well prepared to encounter snow and/or ice if it came earlier than predicted, then I passed a sign predicting traffic delays on 64 east, and I realized I hadn’t read today’s Provision. A sign right at the exit onto 64 said “Prepare to Stop!”, and I decided to take the ramp back into town and read the Provision instead of coming down. 

I hope you all are having a fine meeting and am sorry to be missing it. But I’m grateful as always for your Provision, as for all your wonderful contributions to my life and those of so many others. I’ll use this as a gift to “unplug” for awhile, which will include being with you all in spirit.


Thank you so much for the inspirational message you shared in the IAC VOICE newsletter. I have been praying for you and thinking about you ever since I heard about your seizures and hospitalization. I am so grateful to hear about your tremendous recovery. You are different than before, yes, and yet you are still an amazing person with much learning to share. Thanks for still being you.


I have listened and re-listened to many of your sessions while being certified through Wellcoaches Corporation and read some of your Provisions. Amazing. I wish you all the best. 


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching Internationalwww.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformationwww.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coachingwww.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a TimeOnline Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services

Provision #850: Time to Unplug

Laser Provision

So the Universe gave me a gift: it disconnected me from the virtual world for almost 24 hours. No phones. No internet. No email. No Roku. Nothing. It all went down. Yikes! OMG! What’s a person to do! In my case, I did my best to turn the forced “isolation” into an opportunity to cultivate mindfulness. By getting unplugged from the distracting energies of modern life, I learned more about focusing on the things that really matter. Perhaps it’s time to give yourself that gift as well. Why not consider the possibility with me, as we work our way through today’s Provision?

LifeTrek Provision

This Provision series on Cultivating Mindfulness has included a lot of reflection on the notion of standing still. In Provision #842, Not Knowing Soul, I included several poems that urged us to stand still in order to hear the message of the flowers, the birds, and the wind. It’s hard enough to hear that message when we are standing still; it’s next to impossible to hear it when we are busy-busy and constantly on-the-go. It is only through silence that we can appreciate and learn from the sounds of life.

A month later, in Provision #848, Time to Stand Still, I tackled the subject again with a few reflections on my own life experiences. It’s amazing what I have been able to hear just by listening. The poets are right: the flowers, birds, and winds have much to share when we pay attention. But it’s not just a matter of paying attention, we have to pay attention with the right frame of mind. We have to listen quietly, intently, and curiously. When we pay attention in order to find opportunities to assert ourselves and our agendas out in the world, the messages that life has to teach us go by unnoticed and unappreciated. When we pay attention as a way of unplugging, listening, and transforming ourselves – all that begins to change.

Today I want to reflect on how hard it is to adopt this frame of mind and these practices in the context of the modern world. And, although this topic fits in perfectly, it was not what I intended to write about at all for this week’s Provision. But at the beginning of the week the Universe spoke in a way that could not be ignored. It unplugged me from the modern world. I’m not sure what caused the outage, perhaps road construction, but whatever it was, it took down my cable phone lines as well as my connection to the Internet. I had been literally “unplugged”.

What fascinated me was not the outage itself – those kinds of things happen – what fascinated me was my reaction to the outage. Instead of being upset that I could no longer do my work as usual, I received the outage as a gift. And it wasn’t even hard to do. I had been unplugged through no fault of my own. No one could call me and I could not call anyone. No one could email me and I could not email anyone. I could not visit any websites. And, given my mobility limitations (I’m not legally allowed to drive and it’s risky business to ride my bicycle) I couldn’t just grab my laptop, throw it in my backpack, and go to a coffee shop to take care of business. I was, in other words, more or less isolated from the world at large.

And what a gift that proved to be! I decided to use that relative isolation as a time to cultivate mindfulness. I spent more time than usual rehearsing and reflecting on my day. I started reviewing the books on my bookshelf (all of which I have read and most of which I have forgotten). I engaged in deep breathing exercises. And I closed my eyes to rest. I unplugged my mind from the mundane in order to plug into the profound and vital rhythms of life.

Perhaps that’s why I had no seizures on Monday. None. Not even a twinge. By unplugging from the business of modern life, my brain was perhaps able to heal a bit more and to recover a greater sense of wholeness. That’s at least as good a theory as any.

But we don’t have to wait for outages to get unplugged. We can just decide to make it happen and act accordingly. We can take the phone off the hook, walk away from the computer, turn off the television, and just be alone with our own thoughts or together with the ones we love. That was, of course, the way of things for most of human history. There were no phones, computers, or worldwide webs. There was no electricity, running water, or indoor plumbing. People were either alone, on their own, or working directly with others to meet their survival, social, and spiritual needs.

I encourage you to go back to that time, however briefly, at least once during the week ahead. Better yet: do it once a day. Plan to make such times to happen. Put them on your calendar, if that works best, or do them spontaneously. Either way, do them and then claim them as gifts. Yesterday morning, for example, I went running, which I still do rather tentatively. My wife, in fact, had to give me a little push. “If you want to,” she said, “then go do it. The doctors have said there’s nothing stopping you from running.” Amazingly, given my love of running, I had forgotten that fact. So out the door I went.

And what a time I had. I decided to claim that run as a chance to get unplugged. I wasn’t thinking about what I had to do (which I often forget anyway) or what was waiting for me back home. I wasn’t even thinking about the time of day or my pace. Indeed, I did not have on any kind of watch at all. I was just running for the pure love of running. And it was, indeed, a love. I probably went about 5 miles or 8 kilometers around one street after another. Sure, I started getting tired towards the end of the run, but that was easy to deal with: I just started walking more than running. No matter. I was still moving. I was still burning calories. I was still getting a little more into shape. And I was getting unplugged from the business of life.

That may be what I love most about running. I get lost in the run. I get unplugged from everything else and I just become present in the moment to rhythm of the run, the sound of my breathing, and the natural world around me. Running – getting unplugged – reminds me how truly great it is to be alive.

At the end of my run I had the fun of talking with one of my old running buddies. He was in his car, coming back from the long, Saturday-morning group run that used to be a regular part of my routine. It was great to see him again, to catch up on how things are going, and to find out about some of my old buddies in the group. It may be time for me to start going on those runs again which, ironically, would be another way to unplug. Unplugging is not necessarily retreating away from the world; it can well be retreating from one’s natural routine in order to experiment with supernatural routines. And that’s what happened to me.

I say “supernatural” not in the sense of “super human”. I say “supernatural” only in the way such routines have an almost transcendent power to take us beyond the natural order and rhythms of life. Anyone can find and adopt such routines. We just have to look for them, experiment until we find the ones that are right for us, and then practice them consistently. That really is the formula for getting unplugged: stepping away from the ordinary and stepping into the extraordinary. I encourage you to do that today, or as soon as you are able, and then to develop a pattern for unplugging that feeds and nourishes your soul. Therein lays the key to being seized by life.

Coaching Inquiries: What would it take for you to release any negative images you may hold about yourself and to claim yourself as already a winner? How could you make that shift and who could assist you to do so? Why not find that friend, partner, or coach and do so today?

To reply to this Provision, use our Feedback Form. To talk with us about coaching or consulting services for yourself or your organization, Email Us or use our Contact Form to arrange a complimentary conversation. To learn more about LifeTrek Coaching programs, Click Here.

LifeTrek Readers’ Forum (selected feedback from the past week)

Editor’s Note: The LifeTrek Readers’ Forum contains selections from the comments and materials sent by the readers of LifeTrek Provisions. They do not necessarily reflect the perspective of LifeTrek Coaching International. To submit your comment, use our Feedback Form or Email Bob.


The provision on mindfulness led me to the experience of thankfulness. Yours was an outstanding posting and I will be reading it and re-reading again. Way to go Bob


You speak my mind, but much better than I can speak my mind! Thank you!


It is so hard for people to know, really KNOW, that just being alive is enough. You know. Thank you for preaching that gospel.


I have listened and re-listened to many of your sessions while being certified through Wellcoaches Corp. Very helpful and enjoyable.


May you be filled with goodness, peace, joy, and health.

Bob Tschannen-Moran, MCC, BCC

President, LifeTrek Coaching International, www.LifeTrekCoaching.com
CEO & Co-Founder, Center for School Transformation, www.SchoolTransformation.com
Past President, International Association of Coaching, www.CertifiedCoach.org
Author, Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time, Online Retailers

Address: 121 Will Scarlet Lane, Williamsburg, VA 23185-5043
Phone: (757) 345-3452 • Fax: (772) 382-3258
Skype: LifeTrek • Twitter: @LifeTrekBob
Subscribe/Unsubscribe: Subscriber Services