logo

Resilience Pathway #101: Are You Performing?

For many organizations and their employees, the months of January and February include a review of last year’s performance. This involves reflecting upon accomplishments and also where we could have done better. Can the practice of human performance technology (HPT) help improve your performance? Your organization may already be using HPT to analyze and manage your performance. And you can too!

Human Performance Technology is defined as “the systematic approach to analyzing, improving, and managing performance in the workplace through the use of appropriate and varied interventions.” (American Society for Training & Development 1992) HPT acknowledges that individual work performance is a function of many influences including skills, knowledge, tools, resources, information, feedback, motivation, incentives, to name a few.

Many managers have a tendency to assume a lack of skill or knowledge to be the cause of a performance problem and so prescribe training to correct the problem. Unfortunately, training is only the right solution to a performance problem if the problem exists due to a lack of skill or knowledge. Following the training, if the performance does not improve, often the employee is thought to be incapable of “getting it,” which leads to disciplinary action and sometimes termination.

So how can you put HPT to work for you? To begin, if you are encountering a performance problem, increase awareness and identify the underlying cause. Performance problems may exist due to a:

  • Lack of skills and knowledge • This is the only place where training is the answer.
  • Lack of information and feedback • Ask for clearly defined goals, a job description, and specific, behavior based feedback (the good and the bad).
  • Lack of tools and resources • What tools do you need to perform to the level expected? (Software/hardware, access to information, meetings with key players, etc.)
  • Lack of motivation and incentives • What drives you to perform well? How fulfilled are you with your work? What blocks your motivation? Are the performance incentives supporting you?

Coaching Inquiries: Are you performing optimally? What motivates you to perform? What might be getting in the way of your stellar performance? What can you ask for at work to further support your positive performance?

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #102: Instructional Objectives

As a trainer or teacher, how do you know if your learners have achieved your instructional goals? Ensuring achievement begins with a sound instructional design approach. The purpose of an instructional objective is to create evidence that learning has occurred and also to describe how learning will be measured.

This process begins by translating tasks and content generated in an instructional analysis into performance based goals. In other words, you’ve gathered the information and content needed and now you need to turn this information into learning goals. I like to think of the objectives as the bridge between the analysis step and the instructional design step.

To write an objective, it is important to pick an instructional format. According to Seels and Glasgow, authors of Exercises in Instructional Design, several objective formats are available including one designed by Gagne and Briggs, which  includes a five-component performance objective:

  1. Situation: The condition or “given” of the learning situation. Example: “Given a list of questions.”
  2. Learning Capability: What the learner will be capable of or gain. Example: “The learner will conduct an employment interview.”
  3. Object: The content or task. Example: “The PROBE interviewing technique.”
  4. Action: How the learner will demonstrate the capability. Example: “By asking PROBE based questions that identify an event, role, or outcome.”
  5. Tool / Constraint: What will be available to the learner in terms of tools, resources, times constraints, etc. Example: “Within 15 minutes using the PROBE process.”

The Gagne and Briggs format can be used to create objectives resulting in any one of the following learning outcomes: intellectual skills, cognitive strategies, verbal information, motor skills, or attitudes.

Coaching Inquiries: How do your learning objectives measure up? Following your training, what evidence do you have that learning occurred? Which instructional objective format will you try? 

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #103: Let’s Get Engaged!

Deeply engaging a learner requires that you attract and hold their attention and also that you involve them personally in the process of their learning.

When was the last time that a training workshop you facilitated swept your learners off their feet? That mentally, physically, and emotionally they were so engaged in the learning as to be “taken away” from the reality of life for a while? Really engaging a learner feels akin to watching a great movie: we are swept away until the movie ends and we settle back into real life.

Jane Vella, author of Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach writes about engagement as a principle of adult learning. Engagement enables learners to take an active part in the learning process and also to practice their learning as subjects of their own lives. Begin by designing learning based on a competent needs assessment. This is helping in building engagement into the learning.  Here are some tips to make your learning more engaging:

  • Put yourself in the learner’s shoes when designing learning. Then ask yourself: What activity would be so engaging that I’d be swept away in the learning process?
  • Partner with learners to create a safe learning environment where learners feel free and open to practice, make mistakes, and to give and receive feedback.
  • Design learning exercises that mirror real life, but that are way more fun!
  • Create opportunities for learners to practice the skills or knowledge on their own real life scenarios.
  • Make learning active (never sedentary and simply listening). Allow learners to do what you are teaching.
  • Give a small group of learners the materials and resources they need to respond to an open question. Then turn your content into questions the learners can discover interactively.
  • Do the unexpected while maintaining the safety of the learning environment.

Coaching Inquiries: How engaging is the learning that I design / facilitate? What engages me? What learning exercises will I toss out and replace with ones that are deeply engaging? What learning exercises will sweep my learners off their feet?

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #104: SDL, CBT, and SOJT

Are SDL, CBT, and SOJT familiar acronyms to you? If so, do you use them appropriately to facilitate human learning? This Pathway explains these acronyms and gives you a few pointers for their workplace applications.

Self-Directed Learning (SDL) has been around since the 1950’s with the birth of teaching machines and programmed instruction. SDL traditionally happens without an instructor and is a way to create training where learners master instructionally designed packaged material and are free to do so at their own pace and in a way where they may be able to utilize some of their own unique learning styles.

Some examples of SDL include web-based e-learning, computer based training (CBT) courses, video, printed workbooks, study guides, and structured on the job training. In addition to other benefits, SDL offers many time and cost advantages. Today, organizations are continuing to choose this instructional method over traditional classroom based training. 

To work effectively, SDL has to fit the learning requirements. In one situation, I worked with the material services group of an automotive manufacturer. They contracted with me to create a CBT program to teach their newly hired tow motor drivers how to drive a tow motor in the manufacturing plant. Once the learner completed the tow motor computer based training course, the learner’s driver’s license would print and this was in a sense the “certificate” of course completion.

The material services group wanted this training to decrease costs associated with tow motor accidents and injuries. They thought that CBT, which offered consistency and the ability to handle large numbers of new hires at any given time, was the perfect solution. But using CBT alone was more likely to double or triple their current costs associated with tow motor accidents.

A key consideration this group was overlooking was the importance of Structured On the Job Training (SOJT). Using CBT alone to teach a new hire how to drive a tow motor was not an option. CBT did not allow the learner any supervised time operating the actual tow motor. CBT was a perfect instructional format for the informational parts of the cognitive objective, but using CBT alone would not allow the learner to put the knowledge to work or to achieve the psychomotor objectives required to master driving the tow motor. So CBT and SOJT would have to be used in tandem to achieve the desired results.

Next week, I’ll share with you a model used in schools and corporate organizations called Facilitated Self Directed Learning.

Coaching questions: How could SDL benefit your organization? What is your experience as a learner with SDL? Does the training provided by your organization fully support mastery of the learning objectives? How do you best learn? What’s your unique learning style? 

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #105: Facilitated Self-Directed Learning

“What I hear, I forget; what I see, I remember; but what I do I understand.” • Confucius, 451 B.C.E.

A few months ago, I was in a team meeting with a small group of adults where all but one of us sat and listened for nearly four hours with almost no opportunity to participate or interact. After the first 30 minutes of hearing the same person talk in this meeting, I noticed that my energy level for the topic plummeted. After 90 minutes of this “listening exercise,” I started to get a headache and began to watch the clock hoping the meeting time would soon come to an end. Sound familiar?

Unfortunately, this is not a good way to get people to learn. To sit in a room and simply listen for an extended period of time whether in a classroom setting or in a meeting can be physically and mentally difficult and also may minimize productivity and creativity. Regardless of whether you’re in a meeting or a training room, adults learn best by doing and actively participating. People, teams, students, co-workers, etc. are more engaged and more productive when given considerable time and opportunity to participate and interact verbally and physically.

Facilitated self-directed learning moves in the opposite direction. Knowledge, skills, and behaviors that are learned through discovery in a hands-on, interactive way allow us to retain and demonstrate our learning.

This approach can be used in meetings or to teach by giving the team members or learners an instructionally created packet of information that they will interact with as a way to discover and practice concepts and skills. An effective packet may well consist of the following:

  • Directions for a group or team to appoint a team facilitator, recorder, and time keeper who will each be involved in both moving the team through the packet and participating in the process.
  • A meeting agenda or learning objectives.
  • The content to be discussed or learned.
  • Discussion questions.
  • Detailed action steps for the team members or group of learners to take together as a way to deepen learning, interact with information, make decisions, stimulate productivity, inspire ideas, etc.
  • Opportunities to share ideas and opinions. Opportunities to practice what is being learned / discussed and receive feedback in a safe environment.
  • Summarize next steps.
  • End with a Plus/Delta exercise where the team members assess what worked well in the process and what could be improved.

Coaching Inquiries: How can a facilitated self-directed learning approach serve you or your team? How often do you participate in meetings or training classes? What holds you back from contributing? How often do you invite participation from others in your meetings?

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #106: Be Who You Are

The following self acknowledgement was the outcome of a productive coaching session for me with my coach:

You can be who you are and get what you want.

This acknowledgement was powerful because it grew out of my realization that I was carrying around a self-limiting, self-imposed life rule about how I have to “be” in order to be successful. This came as something of a surprise, since I regularly work with my clients to search for their own self-limiting and self-imposed life rules. And prior to this particular session with my coach, I would have said that I was free from negative life rules of my own. Not!

The self-limiting, self-imposed life rule that I discovered through this coaching session was that I had to be like a pushy sales person in order to get all the clients I wanted in my coaching practice. That idea awakened lots of negative thoughts and energy about pushy sales people. Like most people, I disconnect with anyone who is trying to sell me something that I don’t want or need. So the last thing I wanted to be as a coach with sales responsibilities was a “pushy sales person.”

Without realizing it, I was pressuring myself to be this person and it was deflating me. Because of this life rule, I was not reaching my potential in sales-related situations. In fact, I felt enormous resistance toward sales-related activities most of the time. 

Once I revealed this life rule and released it, in essence operating in a way where I completely broke my rule, things really shifted for me. The sales part of being a coach became about building a relationship. It became light, easy, fun, and being exactly who I want to be and to get what I want. It anchored my leadership as a coach in my being as a person, and that has made all the difference.

Coaching Inquiries: In what life activities do you feel resistance? Could a self-limiting, self-imposed life rule be hiding there? What self-limiting, self-imposed life rules do you live by? What powerful acknowledgement can you give yourself right now? 

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #107: The Human Flower

Have you ever heard of such a thing as a human flower? How about a “Flaminguin?” Well my four year old daughter has. In fact, she can draw them. I’m often fascinated with her ability to put things together in her mind and on paper that in reality don’t belong together. 

A “Flaminguin,” if you haven’t figured it out is a bird that is half Flamingo and half Penguin. And a human flower is a real live, walking, talking, breathing, human size flower.

I’ve often used this approach of putting two things together that typically don’t belong together, to help my coaching clients who are stuck. This practice is also very helpful in sparking a unique idea or creative perspective. This approach helped one of my coaching clients come up with a name for her new business.

Not only can this approach help to spark an idea, it opens up our minds and hearts to a world of possibilities that we may not have otherwise imagined.

Coaching inquiries: What is the “Human Flower” in your life that’s waiting for you to notice? What two differing things in your life could you put together to spark an idea or move forward? Stop and simply notice. What possibilities do you see? 

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #108: The Last Day

My daughter celebrated her last day of first grade a few days ago. It was an interesting and emotional day as I watched how keenly aware most of the 6 year old children in her class were of the fact that, never again, would they all be in the same class together. Sure there was a lot of excitement about summer beginning, but it came in between long hugs goodbye and many tears. What a special day it was to simply sit, embrace the moments of the last day, and also to reflect on the last nine months. 

The children reminisced about all they had learned, all the friendship they made, and all the fun they had. It made me consider how rarely as an adult, I’ve stopped in the month of June to reflect on the learning that’s occurred in my life and also how rarely I reflect on new friendship I’ve made. Not only was it a special day for my daughter to take in and reminisce, it was a special day for me. 

I was so proud of her for all that she’d accomplished. I was also proud to realize all that I had invested in my own personal growth. I was pleasantly surprised too as I reflected on all the new friendships I’ve made since her school year began last August. 

“The Last Day” regardless of the event, is mostly about embracing the last few sweet moments. But it is also about reflecting and saying goodbye. I noticed my daughter transitioning easily to looking forward, and already she’s beginning to build even more in her life. She’s also creating ways to hold on to and grow all those special people and things that have been in her life over the last school year. 

On this particular “last day”, I observed my daughter revisit special moments about her past, embrace and hold on tightly to the present tender last moments of being a first grader, and then shift to imagining her precious future. These sometimes very challenging processes of reflecting on our past, staying in the moment, and building our future seem to come so easily to children. If they can do it so effortlessly, maybe we can too!! 

Coaching Inquiries: Time passes so quickly, so how do you embrace the moments of “the last day?” Now, reflect on the last nine months of your life, what’s different in your life now? What learning has occurred in your life? What new friendships have you made? Imagine your future, what’s it like? 

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #109: Wake Up To Thanks

Several months ago, a friend shared with me a special habit of his where each morning before he gets out of bed he takes a few minutes, as soon as he opens his eyes, to lie quietly and reflect on all that he is thankful for in his life. I then shared with my friend that as a way to influence positive sleep habits, each night before I close my eyes, I take about ten minutes to ponder all that I am thankful for in my life.

Since this conversation I too have taken the first few minutes when I wake up to reflect upon all the richness that I so am grateful for in my life. I have experienced the value of this exercise first hand.

One significant shift this exercise has made in my life is that it sets the stage for my day. It paves the way for me to put positive and appreciate perspectives on life out into the world. This habit is also a reinforcement of a quote that I frequently share with my coaching clients:

“Our lives go in the direction of the words that we speak, the thoughts in our minds, and the feelings in our hearts.”

Reflecting on all that you are thankful for in your life each morning before your feet hit the floor has the potential to shift your thoughts, feelings, and words into a positive and appreciate light for that entire day. It can also shift your focus from all that you don’t have or have not accomplished, to all that you do have and all that you have accomplished in life. Especially if the moment you open your eyes, you find yourself considering all that you have to do for the day, I invite you to try this exercise every morning for the next month and enjoy the shifts it makes for you.

Coaching Inquiries: What are you thankful for? How often do you pause and reflect on all that’s good in your life? What are your first thoughts and feelings when you first open your eyes each morning?

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services

logo

Resilience Pathway #110: Smile

Consider how often you smile in a given day. Smiling is innate, a behavior using over 15 facial muscles that we are pre-programmed to do. Think for a moment how often babies smile and laugh. Smiling portrays a range of positive emotions including confidence, friendliness, and happiness.

Smiling has many positive effects not only on the person who is smiling but also on others who are receiving your smile and positive energy. When you smile as you interact with others it is hard for them not to respond positively to you. 

You may be surprised to learn that smiling and laughing, like aerobic exercise and meditation, stimulate our brains to create endorphins. Endorphins are our body’s natural pain killers and produce a sense of well-being. Endorphins interact with receptor neurons to reduce the intensity of pain. They also generate feelings of euphoria, regulation of appetite, release of sex hormones, and enhancement of the immune system.

Additionally, you’ll find that it is difficult to engage feelings of stress or to respond negatively to stressful situations when you’re authentically displaying your happy grin and bright eyes with a big smile. So try smiling all day long. You’ll feel the positive effects of the endorphins, lower your stress, make a few new friends, and exercise your facial muscles along the way.

Coaching Inquiries: What really makes you smile? How often do you smile? When do you find that you suppress a smile? Have you ever faked a smile? What structure can support you to smile more? 

To reply to this Pathway, use our Feedback Form. If you are interested in learning more about how you can partner with a LifeTrek coach to enhance your resilience, please Email Christina or use the Contact Form to arrange for a complimentary coaching session.

May you be filled with goodness, peace, and joy.

Christina Lombardo, PCC, CPCC (Christina@LifeTrekCoaching.com)
LifeTrek Coaching International
Columbus, OH
U.S.A.

Telephone: 614-332-9747
Fax: 415-634-2301

Subscriber Services